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For decades now, web companies have been terrified by both trade-offs. They have wanted the act of signing up and using their service to seem both totally private and perfectly simple—the very state of affairs that makes adequate security impossible. So they've settled on the strong password as the cure.

Make it long enough, throw in some caps and numbers, tack on an exclamation point, and everything will be fine. But for years it hasn't been fine. In the age of the algorithm, when our laptops pack more processing power than a high-end workstation did a decade ago, cracking a long password with brute force computation takes just a few million extra cycles. That's not even counting the new hacking techniques that simply steal our passwords or bypass them entirely—techniques that no password length or complexity can ever prevent.

Add up the total cost, including lost business, and a single hack can become a billion-dollar catastrophe. How do our online passwords fall? In every imaginable way: They're guessed, lifted from a password dump, cracked by brute force, stolen with a keylogger, or reset completely by conning a company's customer support department.

Let's start with the simplest hack: guessing. Carelessness, it turns out, is the biggest security risk of all. Despite years of being told not to, people still use lousy, predictable passwords. When security consultant Mark Burnett compiled a list of the 10, most common passwords based on easily available sources like passwords dumped online by hackers and simple Google searches , he found the number one password people used was, yes, "password. The number If you use a dumb password like that, getting into your account is trivial. Free software tools with names like Cain and Abel or John the Ripper automate password-cracking to such an extent that, very literally, any idiot can do it.

All you need is an Internet connection and a list of common passwords—which, not coincidentally, are readily available online, often in database-friendly formats. What's shocking isn't that people still use such terrible passwords. It's that some companies continue to allow it. The same lists that can be used to crack passwords can also be used to make sure no one is able to choose those passwords in the first place.

But saving us from our bad habits isn't nearly enough to salvage the password as a security mechanism. Our other common mistake is password reuse. During the past two years, more than million "hashes" i. LinkedIn, Yahoo, Gawker, and eHarmony all had security breaches in which the usernames and passwords of millions of people were stolen and then dropped on the open web. A comparison of two dumps found that 49 percent of people had reused usernames and passwords between the hacked sites. The bad guys are stealing the passwords and selling them quietly on the black market.

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Your login may have already been compromised, and you might not know it—until that account, or another that you use the same credentials for, is destroyed. Hackers also get our passwords through trickery. The most well-known technique is phishing, which involves mimicking a familiar site and asking users to enter their login information. Steven Downey, CTO of Shipley Energy in Pennsylvania, described how this technique compromised the online account of one of his company's board members this past spring. The executive had used a complex alphanumeric password to protect her AOL email.

But you don't need to crack a password if you can persuade its owner to give it to you freely. The hacker phished his way in: He sent her an email that linked to a bogus AOL page, which asked for her password. She entered it. After that he did nothing. At first, that is. The hacker just lurked, reading all her messages and getting to know her. He learned where she banked and that she had an accountant who handled her finances. He even learned her electronic mannerisms, the phrases and salutations she used.

An even more sinister means of stealing passwords is to use malware: hidden programs that burrow into your computer and secretly send your data to other people. According to a Verizon report, malware attacks accounted for 69 percent of data breaches in They are epidemic on Windows and, increasingly, Android. Malware works most commonly by installing a keylogger or some other form of spyware that watches what you type or see.

Its targets are often large organizations, where the goal is not to steal one password or a thousand passwords but to access an entire system. One devastating example is ZeuS, a piece of malware that first appeared in Clicking a rogue link, usually from a phishing email, installs it on your computer. Then, like a good human hacker, it sits and waits for you to log in to an online banking account somewhere.

As soon as you do, ZeuS grabs your password and sends it back to a server accessible to the hacker. Targeting such companies is actually typical. Essentially, he's the guy in charge of figuring out how to get us past the current password regime. Until we figure out a better system for protecting our stuff online, here are four mistakes you should never make—and four moves that will make your accounts harder but not impossible to crack. If our problems with passwords ended there, we could probably save the system.

We could ban dumb passwords and discourage reuse. We could train people to outsmart phishing attempts. Just look closely at the URL of any site that asks for a password. We could use antivirus software to root out malware. But we'd be left with the weakest link of all: human memory. Passwords need to be hard in order not to be routinely cracked or guessed. So if your password is any good at all, there's a very good chance you'll forget it—especially if you follow the prevailing wisdom and don't write it down.

Because of that, every password-based system needs a mechanism to reset your account. And the inevitable trade-offs security versus privacy versus convenience mean that recovering a forgotten password can't be too onerous. That's precisely what opens your account to being easily overtaken via social engineering. Although "socialing" was responsible for just 7 percent of the hacking cases that government agencies tracked last year, it raked in 37 percent of the total data stolen.

Socialing is how my Apple ID was stolen this past summer. The hackers persuaded Apple to reset my password by calling with details about my address and the last four digits of my credit card. Because I had designated my Apple mailbox as a backup address for my Gmail account, the hackers could reset that too, deleting my entire account—eight years' worth of email and documents—in the process. They also posed as me on Twitter and posted racist and antigay diatribes there. After my story set off a wave of publicity, Apple changed its practices: It temporarily quit issuing password resets over the phone.

But you could still get one online. And so a month later, a different exploit was used against New York Times technology columnist David Pogue. This time the hackers were able to reset his password online by getting past his "security questions. You know the drill. To reset a lost login, you need to supply answers to questions that supposedly only you know. Answers to the first two were available on Google: He had written that a Corolla had been his first car, and had recently sung the praises of his Toyota Prius. The hackers just took a wild guess on the third question.

It turns out that at the dawn of the new millennium, David Pogue, like the rest of the world, was at a "party. With that, the hackers were in. They dove into his address book he's pals with magician David Blaine! OK, you might think, but that could never happen to me: David Pogue is Internet- famous, a prolific writer for the major media whose every brain wave goes online. But have you thought about your LinkedIn account? Your Facebook page? Your kids' pages or your friends' or family's?

If you have a serious web presence, your answers to the standard questions—still often the only options available—are trivial to root out. Your mother's maiden name is on Ancestry. The ultimate problem with the password is that it's a single point of failure, open to many avenues of attack. We can't possibly have a password-based security system that's memorable enough to allow mobile logins, nimble enough to vary from site to site, convenient enough to be easily reset, and yet also secure against brute-force hacking.

But today that's exactly what we're banking on—literally. Who is doing this? Who wants to work that hard to destroy your life? The answer tends to break down into two groups, both of them equally scary: overseas syndicates and bored kids. The syndicates are scary because they're efficient and wildly prolific.

Malware and virus-writing used to be something hobbyist hackers did for fun, as proofs of concept. Not anymore. Sometime around the mids, organized crime took over. Today's virus writer is more likely to be a member of the professional criminal class operating out of the former Soviet Union than some kid in a Boston dorm room. There's a good reason for that: money. Moreover, they are targeting not just businesses and financial institutions but individuals too. Russian cybercriminals, many of whom have ties to the traditional Russian mafia, took in tens of millions of dollars from individuals last year, largely by harvesting online banking passwords through phishing and malware schemes.

In other words, when someone steals your Citibank password, there's a good chance it's the mob. But teenagers are, if anything, scarier, because they're so innovative. The groups that hacked David Pogue and me shared a common member: a year-old kid who goes by the handle "Dictate. He's just calling companies or chatting with them online and asking for password resets. But that does not make him any less effective. He and others like him start by looking for information about you that's publicly available: your name, email, and home address, for example, which are easy to get from sites like Spokeo and WhitePages.

Then he uses that data to reset your password in places like Hulu and Netflix, where billing information, including the last four digits of your credit card number, is kept visibly on file.

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Once he has those four digits, he can get into AOL, Microsoft, and other crucial sites. Soon, through patience and trial and error, he'll have your email, your photos, your files—just as he had mine. Why do kids like Dictate do it? Mostly just for lulz: to fuck shit up and watch it burn. One favorite goal is merely to piss off people by posting racist or otherwise offensive messages on their personal accounts. As Dictate explains, "Racism invokes a funnier reaction in people. Hacking, people don't care too much. When we jacked jennarose3xo"—aka Jenna Rose, an unfortunate teen singer whose videos got widely hate-watched in —"I got no reaction from just tweeting that I jacked her stuff.

We got a reaction when we uploaded a video of some black guys and pretended to be them. A lot of these kids came out of the Xbox hacking scene, where the networked competition of gamers encouraged kids to learn cheats to get what they wanted. In particular they developed techniques to steal so-called OG original gamer tags—the simple ones, like Dictate instead of Dictate—from the people who'd claimed them first.

One hacker to come out of that universe was "Cosmo," who was one of the first to discover many of the most brilliant socialing exploits out there, including those used on Amazon and PayPal. When the FBI finally arrested this shadowy figure in June, they found that he was just 15 years old; when he and I met a few months later, I had to drive. It's precisely because of the relentless dedication of kids like Dictate and Cosmo that the password system cannot be salvaged.

You can't arrest them all, and even if you did, new ones would keep growing up. Think of the dilemma this way: Any password-reset system that will be acceptable to a year-old user will fall in seconds to a year-old hacker. For the same reason, many of the silver bullets that people imagine will supplement—and save—passwords are vulnerable as well.

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For example, last spring hackers broke into the security company RSA and stole data relating to its SecurID tokens, supposedly hack-proof devices that provide secondary codes to accompany passwords. RSA never divulged just what was taken, but it's widely believed that the hackers got enough data to duplicate the numbers the tokens generate. If they also learned the tokens' device IDs, they'd be able to penetrate the most secure systems in corporate America.

On the consumer side, we hear a lot about the magic of Google's two-factor authentication for Gmail. It works like this: First you confirm a mobile phone number with Google. After that, whenever you try to log in from an unfamiliar IP address, the company sends an additional code to your phone: the second factor. Does this keep your account safer? Absolutely, and if you're a Gmail user, you should enable it this very minute.

Will a two-factor system like Gmail's save passwords from obsolescence? Let me tell you about what happened to Matthew Prince. They wanted to get into his Google Apps account, but it was protected by two-factor. What to do? Give the carrier those nine digits—or even just the last four—along with the name, phone number, and billing address on an account and it lets anyone add a forwarding number to any account in its system.

And getting a Social Security number these days is simple: They're sold openly online, in shockingly complete databases. So when the automated call came in, it was forwarded to them. Two-factor just added a second step and a little expense. The longer we stay on this outdated system—the more Social Security numbers that get passed around in databases, the more login combinations that get dumped, the more we put our entire lives online for all to see—the faster these hacks will get. And no one has figured out what will take its place.

What we can say for sure is this: Access to our data can no longer hinge on secrets—a string of characters, 10 strings of characters, the answers to 50 questions—that only we're supposed to know.

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The Internet doesn't do secrets. Everyone is a few clicks away from knowing everything. Instead, our new system will need to hinge on who we are and what we do: where we go and when, what we have with us, how we act when we're there. And each vital account will need to cue off many such pieces of information—not just two, and definitely not just one. This last point is crucial. It's what's so brilliant about Google's two-factor authentication, but the company simply hasn't pushed the insight far enough. Two factors should be a bare minimum. Think about it: When you see a man on the street and think it might be your friend, you don't ask for his ID.

Instead, you look at a combination of signals. He has a new haircut, but does that look like his jacket? Does his voice sound the same? Is he in a place he's likely to be? If many points don't match, you wouldn't believe his ID; even if the photo seemed right, you'd just assume it had been faked. And that, in essence, will be the future of online identity verification. For all the trappings of success—his multinational businesses, his vast wealth, his loving family—Grey is a man tormented by demons and consumed by the need to control.

This book is intended for mature audiences. Best friends and social media stars Eugene, Keith, Ned, and Zach are admired for their curiosity, humor, bravado, and fearlessness. But that self-confidence came from their willingness to take big risks—being open to try something new or unusual, even if they failed spectacularly in the attempt.

To be our best selves, we have to challenge ourselves. In dedicating ourselves to embracing fear, foolishness, and embarrassment, we can learn to recognize the ways in which we often hold ourselves back. Throughout, Eugene, Keith, Ned, and Zach open the doors to the past, showing their fans how four nerdy, timid, self-conscious boys grew up into four super-hot-mega-babes secure in their insecurities. This fast-paced, action-packed adventure—which is set in the world of I Am Number Four—is perfect for fans of the Darkest Minds series and the X-Men franchise.

After the battle in Switzerland, the Fugitive Six find their allegiances torn, dividing them into two factions. Taylor, Kopano, and Nigel return to the Academy with Nine, but nothing is the same. As fear and resentment of the Human Garde continues to grow, the United Nations decrees that all humans with Legacies must be implanted with inhibitors.

So our heroes will have no choice but to rebel. And with the Foundation still at large, Isabela, Caleb, and Ran have decided to join forces with their former foes Einar and Five to hunt them down. But when a new threat is revealed, the group may find itself painfully outmatched. Facing capture or annihilation from all sides, the only hope the Human Garde have for survival is to stand together once and for all to fight back against their true enemies.

Return to Zero is the epic conclusion to the story of the Garde that began with the worldwide phenomenon I Am Number Four. Account Options Sign in. Top Charts. New Arrivals. Top-selling audiobooks. See more. The Art of War. Sun Tzu. Thus, when able to attack, we must seem unable. Hold out bait to entice the enemy. Feign disorder, and crush him. If he is in superior strength, evade him. If your opponent is quick to anger, seek to irritate him.

Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant. Read widely in the east since its appearance 2, years ago, The Art of War first came to the West with a French Jesuit in It has been studied by generals from Napoleon to Rommel, and it is still required reading in most military academies of the world. Although it was meant to be a practical guide to warfare in the age of chariots, many corporate and government leaders have successfully applied its lessons to battles in the modern dog-eat-dog world.

Sun Tzu covers all aspects of war in his time, from strategy and tactics to the proper use of terrain and spies. In this version, Sun Tzu's lessons are brought to life with commentaries from ancient Chinese history, which illustrate both the philosophy and the principles of his teachings. Napoleon Hill. Mark Manson. Good Omens.

Neil Gaiman. Winner of the Audiophile Magazine Earphones Award. And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist. Where the Crawdads Sing. Delia Owens. I didn't want this story to end! So in late , when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand.

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Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder.

Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps. The Art of War will teach you to conquer your opponents and gain a loyal following.. Gary John Bishop.

Backlash: A Thriller. Brad Thor. In ancient texts, there are stories about men who struck from the shadows, seemingly beyond the reach of death itself. These men were considered part angel, part demon. Their loyalty was to their families, their friends, and their kings.

You crossed these men at your peril. And once crossed, there was no crossing back. They were fearless; men of honor who have been known throughout history by different names: Spartan, Viking, Samurai. Today, men like these still strike from the shadows. They are highly prized intelligence agents, military operatives, and assassins.

One man is all three. Two days ago, that man was crossed—badly. Now, far from home and surrounded by his enemy, Scot Harvath must battle his way out. With no support, no cavalry coming, and no one even aware of where he is, it will take everything he has ever learned to survive. Harvath wants revenge. In the most explosive novel Brad Thor has ever written, page after captivating page of action, intrigue, loyalty, and betrayal will keep you hooked until the very last sentence.

Lovecraft: The Complete Fiction. P Lovecraft. The Nameless City The Festival The Colour Out of Space The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness The Dreams in the Witch House The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow Over Innsmouth The Shadow Out of Time At the Mountains of Madness The Case of Charles Dexter Ward Azathoth Beyond the Wall of Sleep Cool Air Dagon Ex Oblivione From Beyond He Herbert West-Reanimator Hypnos In the Vault Memory Nyarlathotep Pickman's Model The Book The Cats of Ulthar The Descendant The Doom That Came to Sarnath The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath The Evil Clergyman The Horror at Red Hook The Hound The Lurking Fear The Moon-Bog The Music of Erich Zann The Other Gods The Outsider The Picture in the House The Quest of Iranon The Rats in the Walls The Shunned House The Silver Key The Statement of Randolph Carter The Strange High House in the Mist The Street The Terrible Old Man The Thing on the Doorstep The Tomb The Transition of Juan Romero The Tree The Unnamable The White Ship What the Moon Brings Polaris The Very Old Folk Ibid Old Bugs A Reminiscence of Dr.

Samuel Johnson The History of the Necronomicon. George Orwell. Blackstone Audio presents a new recording of this immensely popular book. George Orwell depicts a gray, totalitarian world dominated by Big Brother and its vast network of agents, including the Thought Police, a world in which news is manufactured according to the authorities' will and people live tepid lives by rote. Winston Smith, the hero with no heroic qualities, longs only for truth and decency.

But living in a social system in which privacy does not exist and where those with unorthodox ideas are brainwashed or put to death, he knows there is no hope for him. He knows even as he continues to pursue his forbidden love affair that eventually he will come to destruction. The year has come and gone, yet George Orwell's nightmare vision in of the world we were becoming is still the great modern classic of negative Utopia. James Allen. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. Neil deGrasse Tyson. What is the nature of space and time? How do we fit within the universe?

How does the universe fit within us? There's no better guide through these mind-expanding questions than acclaimed astrophysicist and bestselling author Neil deGrasse Tyson. But today, few of us have time to contemplate the cosmos. So Tyson brings the universe down to Earth succinctly and clearly, with sparkling wit, in digestible chapters consumable anytime and anywhere in your busy day.

While waiting for your morning coffee to brew, or while waiting for the bus, the train, or the plane to arrive, Astrophysics for People in a Hurry will reveal just what you need to be fluent and ready for the next cosmic headlines: from the Big Bang to black holes, from quarks to quantum mechanics, and from the search for planets to the search for life in the universe.

A Good Marriage. Stephen King. This horrifying discovery, rendered with bristling intensity, could be the end of what Darcy though was a good marriage…. The Little Book of Mindfulness: 10 minutes a day to less stress, more peace. Patrizia Collard. Mindfulness is such a great way to live life to the full. Take my advice, buy it now and you will wonder how you ever managed without it! I love this little book! Lovely little calming book.

It has fast become the slow way to manage the modern world - without chanting mantras or setting aside hours of time for meditation. Dr Patrizia Collard will show you how to bring simple 5- and minute practices into your day in order to free yourself from stress and, ultimately, find more peace in your life. This audiobook will set you and your family on the road of mindfulness so you can lead a more mindful, peaceful and relaxed life.

Find long-lasting happiness with The Little Book of Mindfulness! Being in the Now 2. Accept and Respond 3. Making Your Mind Up 4. Simply Be 5. Mindful Eating 6. Gratitude and Compassion 7. Everyday Mindfulness Dr Patrizia Collard is a psychotherapist, mindfulness teacher, stress management consultant and lecturer in psychotherapy at the University of East London. Dr Collard's wide range of approaches and methodologies includes mindfulness-based cognitive behavioural therapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy, core energy management, existential therapy, drama therapy, yoga and meditation, relaxation, and self-hypnosis.

Dr Collard lives in South London. All Systems Red. Martha Wells. For fans of Westworld and Ex Machina. All Systems Red by Martha Wells begins The Murderbot Diaries, a new science fiction action and adventure series that tackles questions of the ethics of sentient robotics. Banks' Culture novels. The main character is a deadly security droid that has bucked its restrictive programming and is balanced between contemplative self-discovery and an idle instinct to kill all humans. In a corporate-dominated spacefaring future, planetary missions must be approved and supplied by the Company.

Exploratory teams are accompanied by Company-supplied security androids, for their own safety. But in a society where contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder, safety isn't a primary concern. On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied 'droid - a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself though never out loud as "Murderbot.

But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it's up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth. Philip Houston. Three former CIA officers—among the world's foremost authorities on recognizing deceptive behavior—share their proven techniques for uncovering a lie Imagine how different your life would be if you could tell whether someone was lying or telling you the truth.

Douglas Adams. Deepak Chopra. Deals ending soon. Viktor E.


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Chapo Trap House. Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto. Mark R. Beginning just less than seven hours after The Gunslinger ends, in the second installment to the thrilling Dark Tower Series, Roland encounters three mysterious doorways on a deserted beach along the Western Sea. It is a science fiction odyssey that is unlike any tale that Stephen King has ever written. Tessa Dare. The Richest Man in Babylon. George S. George S Clason is best known for writing a series of informational pamphlets about being thrifty and how to achieve financial success.

He started writing the pamphlets in , using parables that were set in ancient Babylon. Banks and insurance companies began to distribute the parables and the most famous ones were compiled into the book The Richest Man in Babylon. It is this book which has etched the name of George S Clason into the history books and has provided generations of readers not just an inspirational classic for reading pleasure but sound practical principles of financial discipline. This is the most famous of his treasured works. The Richest Man in Babylon is a chapter sketch.

Harv Eker. The shocking answer is: None of the above! Rise of the Valiant Kings and Sorcerers--Book 2. Morgan Rice. Perry N. Despite enormous opposition from some political segments and the catastrophic effects of the AIDS crisis, the last five decades have witnessed improvement in the conditions of the lives of LGBTQ individuals in the United States. As such, the realities and challenges faced by a young gay man coming of age and coming out in the s is, in many profound ways, different from the experiences of a young gay man coming of age and coming out today. Out in Time explores the life experiences of three generations of gay men --the Stonewall, AIDS, and Queer generations-- arguing that while there are generational differences in the lived experiences of young gay men, each one confronts its own unique historical events, realities, and socio-political conditions, there are consistencies across time that define and unify the identity formation of gay men.

Guided by the vast research literature on gay identity formation and coming out, the ideas and themes explored here are seen through the oral histories of a diverse set of fifteen gay men, five from each generation. Out in Time demonstrates how early life challenges define and shape the life courses of gay men, demarcating both the specific time-bound challenges encountered by each generation, and the universal challenges encountered by gay men coming of age across all generations and the conditions that define their lives.

The Stonewall Reader. New York Public Library. For the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, an anthology chronicling the tumultuous fight for LGBTQ rights in the s and the activists who spearheaded it, with a foreword by Edmund White. June 28, marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, which is considered the most significant event in the gay liberation movement, and the catalyst for the modern fight for LGBTQ rights in the United States. Drawing from the New York Public Library's archives, The Stonewall Reader is a collection of first accounts, diaries, periodic literature, and articles from LGBTQ magazines and newspapers that documented both the years leading up to and the years following the riots.

The anthology focuses on the events of , the five years before, and the five years after. Andrew Sean Greer. A struggling novelist travels the world to avoid an awkward wedding in this hilarious Pulitzer Prize-winning novel full of "arresting lyricism and beauty" The New York Times Book Review. You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years is engaged to someone else. You can't say yes--it would be too awkward--and you can't say no--it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world.

What would possibly go wrong? Arthur Less will almost fall in love in Paris, almost fall to his death in Berlin, barely escape to a Moroccan ski chalet from a Saharan sandstorm, accidentally book himself as the only writer-in-residence at a Christian Retreat Center in Southern India, and encounter, on a desert island in the Arabian Sea, the last person on Earth he wants to face.

Somewhere in there: he will turn fifty. Through it all, there is his first love. And there is his last. Because, despite all these mishaps, missteps, misunderstandings and mistakes, Less is, above all, a love story. A scintillating satire of the American abroad, a rumination on time and the human heart, a bittersweet romance of chances lost, by an author The New York Times has hailed as "inspired, lyrical," "elegiac," "ingenious," as well as "too sappy by half," Less shows a writer at the peak of his talents raising the curtain on our shared human comedy.

It's no less than bedazzling, bewitching and be-wonderful. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe. Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common.

But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be. Tony Kushner.

Presenting an original audiobook performance of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play, starring the cast of the National Theatre's Broadway revival. In this production, adapted especially for the listening experience, Andrew Garfield, Nathan Lane, and the entire cast recreate their acclaimed performances from the Tony Award-winning National Theatre revival of Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes. With narration by Bobby Cannavale and Edie Falco, and a musical score by Adrian Sutton, this audiobook is a compelling and immersive theatrical listening experience.

A play in two parts, Millennium Approaches and Perestroika, Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes is a complex and insightful look into identity, community, justice, and redemption. New Yorkers grapple with life and death, love and sex, and heaven and hell as the AIDS crisis intensifies during a time of political reaction--the Reagan Republican counterrevolution of the s. Published to celebrate the Broadway revival, this is a unique opportunity to hear one of the most honored and timeless plays in American history.

Music by Adrian Sutton. Gigi Gorgeous. Today, Gigi Gorgeous is beloved for her critically-acclaimed documentary, her outrageous sense of humor, her no-holds-barred honesty, and her glam Hollywood lifestyle. Ten years ago, she was a gawky Canadian teen named Gregory. In He Said, She Said, Gigi brings us on her personal journey from Gregory to Gigi, going deeper than ever before and exposing her vulnerability behind each struggle and triumph, with her signature humor on every page.

She walks us through her transition, baring it all about dating and heartbreak in her stories of falling in love with both men and women. Uproarious, unconventional, and unabashedly candid, Gigi shares never-before-heard stories, inspiration, and advice about how your life can take you to incredible places once you get real with yourself.

Ocean Vuong. At once a witness to the fraught yet undeniable love between a single mother and her son, it is also a brutally honest exploration of race, class, and masculinity. With stunning urgency and grace, Ocean Vuong writes of people caught between disparate worlds, and asks how we heal and rescue one another without forsaking who we are. The question of how to survive, and how to make of it a kind of joy, powers the most important debut novel of many years.


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  • Hell Comes for the Hurried?

I'm Kidding. Ellen DeGeneres. Ellen DeGeneres's winning, upbeat candor has made her show one of the most popular, resilient, and honored daytime shows on the air, and her life makes for great and very funny reading. Relatable, her first stand-up special in 15 years, airs on Netflix beginning December 18, So I hope that you'll take a moment to sit back, relax and enjoy the words I've put together for you in this book. I think you'll find I've left no stone unturned, no door unopened, no window unbroken, no rug unvacuumed, no ivories untickled. What I'm saying is, let us begin, shall we?

I'm Kidding is a lively, hilarious, and often sweetly poignant look at the life of the much-loved entertainer as she opens up about her personal life, her talk show, and more. Karamo Brown. It comprises every adversity he has overcome, as well as the lessons he has learned along the way. It is only by exploring our difficulties and having the hard conversations—with ourselves and one another—that we are able to adjust our mind-sets, heal emotionally, and move forward to live our best lives.

George R. There his family dwells in peace and comfort: his proud wife, Catelyn; his sons Robb, Brandon, and Rickon; his daughters Sansa and Arya; and his bastard son, Jon Snow. Far to the north, behind the towering Wall, lie savage Wildings and worse—unnatural things relegated to myth during the centuries-long summer, but proving all too real and all too deadly in the turning of the season.

Yet a more immediate threat lurks to the south, where Jon Arryn, the Hand of the King, has died under mysterious circumstances. All are heading for Winterfell and a fateful encounter that will change the course of kingdoms. Meanwhile, across the Narrow Sea, Prince Viserys, heir of the fallen House Targaryen, which once ruled all of Westeros, schemes to reclaim the throne with an army of barbarian Dothraki—whose loyalty he will purchase in the only coin left to him: his beautiful yet innocent sister, Daenerys.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Where are these pens? Why are we born? Why do we die? For all the answers, stick your thumb to the stars! Characters frolic through the galaxy with infectious joy. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Ready Player One. Ernest Cline. When cruel Queen Cerisi's son takes the Iron Throne following the death of its king, Robert Baratheon, the Queen's sons and Robert's brothers battle for control of the realm. Robert's young daughter, Princess Arya Stark, flees the kingdom disguised as a boy, as the exiled last heir of the former ruling family tends to his dragons.

Meanwhile, the guardians of the realm's Wall dwindle in numbers as menacing barbarians gather their forces. Set in a glittering fantasy world enriched by 8, years of history, this baroque jewel captivates with its believable characters, deftly realized magic, and intricate plotting.

The Fellowship of the Ring. Inspired by The Hobbit, and begun in , The Lord of the Rings is a trilogy that Tolkien created to provide "the necessary background of history for Elvish tongues. The Fellowship of the Ring, the first volume in the trilogy, tells of the fateful power of the One Ring. It begins a magnificent tale of adventure that will plunge the members of the Fellowship of the Ring into a perilous quest and set the stage for the ultimate clash between powers of good and evil. In this splendid, unabridged audio production of Tolkien's great work, all the inhabitants of a magical universe-hobbits, elves, and wizards-step colorfully forth from the pages.

Rob Inglis' narration has been praised as a masterpiece of audio. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Doctor Sleep: A Novel. On highways across America, a tribe of people called the True Knot travel in search of sustenance. They look harmless—mostly old, lots of polyester, and married to their RVs. But as Dan Torrance knows, and spunky twelve-year-old Abra Stone learns, the True Knot are quasi-immortal, living off the steam that children with the shining produce when they are slowly tortured to death.

Finally, he settles in a New Hampshire town, an AA community that sustains him, and a job at a nursing home where his remnant shining power provides the crucial final comfort to the dying. This is an epic war between good and evil, a gory and glorious story that will thrill the millions of devoted readers of The Shining and satisfy anyone new to this icon in the Stephen King canon. The Silent Patient. Alex Michaelides.