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It is a fascinating book that is all the more important to read right now. It was a pleasure to talk to Erica Lehrer about her book. Podcast: Download Duration: — New Books Network. Sonja Luehrmann explores the Soviet atheist effort to build a society without gods or spirits and its afterlife in post-Soviet religious revival. Sonja Luehrmann explores the Soviet atheist effort to build a society without gods or spirits and Psychological harassment at work, or "mobbing," has become a significant public policy issue in Italy and elsewhere in Europe. Mobbing has given rise to specialized counseling clinics, a new field of professional expertise, and new labor laws.

For Noelle J. Psychological harassment at work, or "mobbing," has become a significant public policy issue in Since the end of Communism, Jews from around the world have visited Poland to tour Holocaust-related sites. A few venture further, seeking to learn about their own Polish roots and connect with contemporary Poles.

For their part, a growing number of Poles are fascinated by all things Jewish.

Erica Lehrer

Erica T. Lehrer explores the intersection of Polish and Since the end of Communism, Jews from around the world have visited Poland to tour Holocaust-related Is 21st-century Rome a global city?

Is it part of Europe's core or periphery? This volume examines the "real city" beyond Rome's historical center, exploring the diversity and challenges of life in neighborhoods affected by immigration, neoliberalism, formal urban planning, and grassroots social movements. Her own journey becomes part of the story as she demonstrates that Jews and Poles use spaces, institutions, interpersonal exchanges, and cultural representations to make sense of their historical inheritances.

Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places by Erica T. Lehrer

Despite Poland's minuscule contemporary Jewish population estimates from the decade ending in vary from about 5, to 20, among 40 million Poles , in the past fifteen years the country has seen a profusion of Jewish-themed events, venues, and sites. Jewish conferences, ceremonies, memorials, performances, festivals, and other events in Poland outstrip public programming in countries with much larger Jewish communities.

I arrived in Kazimierz for the first time in April of It was a fortuitous moment; ferried by a hospitable middle-aged Polish painter who had become my and my brother's impromptu tour guide to the city, we drove into the bleak neighborhood under a white banner stretched across the road, advertising the second annual Festival of Jewish Culture. We walked the few steps down to the old synagogue, where we saw a small crowd of people—the only sign of life in the otherwise dreary square—filing into the old synagogue museum for a concert.

Our host was tickled by his good fortune in stumbling on such an apposite event for his Jewish guests. I was still orienting myself to the idea of Jewish entertainment in what for me was a post-apocalyptic Jewish site, when the evening's performer, cantor Jeffrey Nadel from Washington, D.

Concordia University

A few days after arriving in Warsaw on that first East European trip in , which had been inspired by the revolutions of the previous months, my brother and I found ourselves circling the city's central synagogue. The building's somber, grey exterior matched the sky and still-leafless trees, and we wondered who, if anyone, would be inside. We also wondered what we were doing there. If we didn't know what we wanted to see nor what we expected, it was in any case not what we encountered.

The doors of the synagogue flew open and out poured a stream of Jewish American teenagers. Ooh baby! It was difficult not to stare. We approached two middle-aged women who appeared to be with the group, standing guard outside; they had been eyeing us warily. I asked about the nature of the trip. Still trying to comprehend what this enormous parade of American teenagers was up to, I asked what they had been doing in the synagogue.

We Polish Jews…We, everliving, who have perished in the ghettos and camps, and we ghosts who, from across seas and oceans, will some day return to the homeland and haunt the ruins in our unscarred bodies and our wretched, presumably spared souls.


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Max had been involved in numerous local projects and delights the employees of the bookshop with his periodic gifts of falafel. What Jews?

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Why would a Pole open a Jewish bookstore? Jewish visitors ask. A non-Jewish Jewish bookstore would be cause enough for suspicion what are they doing with our culture? But a Polish one? This combination violates the basic order of a Jewish moral universe built from grandparents' stories of Poles turning over Jews to the Nazis for vodka. So I took it over, moved it next door, threw out the other 90 percent of the books, and began to increase the Judaica.